What could you cut out for one week?

Last January, I wrote a post called "When the Dawn Breaks and the Alarm Rings." It was about facing the morning in a creative spirit. To this post Leah from Struggle in a Bungalow Kitchen added a comment about the need for a morning routine as encouraged in Twyla Tharp's, The Creative Habit. I responded then that I was going to check out this suggested book but as of a couple weeks ago I hadn't quite gotten around to it. When I was in Boston, however, poking around a great indy bookstore, there it was sitting on a display table just waiting to go home with me. And so it did. I read it on interstates 80 and 90, traveling through Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana on our way home.

I appreciate Leah's recommendation of this book because it is filled with lots of practical advice--not theory--on productive creativity. A primary theme throughout the book is how to structure your life so that you can carry through on creating what you want to create.

Here's an example. Tharp writes,

"When I want to commit to a project, I don't expand my contact with the world; I try to cut it off. I want to place myself in a bubble of monomaniacal absorption where I'm fully invested in the task at hand. As a result, I find I'm often subtracting things from my life rather than adding them. I've turned that into a ritual as well. I list the biggest distractions in my life and make a pact with myself to do without them for a week."

Then she lists some of the things that keep appearing on her list of distractions:
–Movies
–Multitasking (This is interesting because it is tempting to think if I just could multitask better think how much more could get done)
–Numbers (eg, bathroom scales, bank statements)
–Background music

She suggestions some distractions her readers may want to try doing without for one week:
–Mirrors
–Clocks
–Newspapers
–Speaking

This has been good food for thought for me as I consider how to achieve a new rhythm of work and study now that both sons are away at school. Hmm...What things might I put on my list to cut for a week in order to free up time and reduce distractions:
–Television
–Cooking
–Telephone
–Hair dryer
–Mail (email might be too hard, although the time freed would be greater)

These are thoughts, not yet resolutions.

What comes to your mind as distractions you could cut for a week in order to make concerted progress toward a goal?